Image [cc] Slippery Tiger

I have found that librarians at law firms walk a tightrope strung over the thorny issues of cost, risk and user demands. We have a reputation of being “gatekeepers” or impeding advances in legal research by holding on to old media at the expense of new media. Although it may be

Recently there have been a few blog posting here about vendors, people who try to sell other people products and services. The postings are rants or raves, the kind of things that are well suited to the self indulgent nature of blogs. One such story was mine, recounted by another member of the 3 Geeks

I was in Nashville last week at the ILTA conference and Alternative Fee Arrangements were all the rage. My good friend Toby Brown, or as I like to call him Reverend Pricing, will be the first to tell you that the greatest, most brilliantly structured AFA does you no good if you can’t control costs.

I have a friend that noticed that one of the products she was using to pull company information was giving her some bad results. The data was either out-of-date, or was just flat out wrong. When she notified the vendor of the error, she got a little bit of the run around on why it

Although there are a lot of people on the Law-Lib listserv, I also happen to know that many of the people I know at AALL don’t subscribe for one reason or another (you can probably guess a few of those reasons.) However, one thing that did fly by on the list is a request for

Mary Abraham at Above and Beyond KM suggests that “the current approach to legal research is fundamentally flawed”, and should be turned on its head. While lawyers skills rests within their ability to negotiate, write, analyse and advise, the way Westlaw and Lexis (Wexis) research is conducted, it turns the process in to “a frustrating