3/16/17

Who Leads the Law Library? How About Law Librarians?

There are two standard answers to questions asked in a law firm setting.

  1. Well... it depends.
  2. You have to understand, we're unique.

Both of them drive us nuts, but we get used to them and adjust or responses over time to limit the eye-roll and shaking of the head to a minimum.

When it comes to where a law firm library falls in the structure of law firm administration, both answers tend to get applied. If you were to look at the AmLaw200 firms, you will find that the law library function falls under many different types of leaders.

  1. Library Directors who report to:
    - COO
    - CMO
    - CIO
    - CKO (non-librarian)
    - (I'll group these as CxO from this point)
    - Managing Partner
  2. Library Managers who report to:
    - KM Directors
    - CxO
  3. CKO (librarian C-Level) who report to:
    - COO
    - Managing Partner
By my count, there are approximately 7 CKO where they are Librarians in the AmLaw 200. (Or some variation, like me, where I am a Chief Knowledge Services Officer) As you might think, I have a bias toward this style of management. I've stressed the ability for law librarians to direct their own fates for nearly the entire decade I've written this blog, and will continue to do so as I take on a President role in the American Association of Law Libraries in July, and well beyond that. 


I mentioned in a post last year that if Law Librarians don't find themselves a seat at the table, they will find themselves on the menu. When I tell other law librarians this, they agree, but then they look at me and say, "Greg, you have to understand, we're unique at my firm." What this typically means is that their firm doesn't want to challenge the status quo, and likes things to stay as they are. There are firms with Library Directors that are much more progressive and forward thinking than me, yet there is no path to a C-Level for them at their firm. That's a shame. The Law Library and its functions of compiling, analyzing, filtering, and producing legal and other information is one of the most important administrative functions that a law firm has. It keeps attorneys practice ready and up to speed on the very functions that drive the legal industry. We do the due diligence necessary to keep our attorneys informed and prepared. In the Information Age, we are the Information Professionals.

BloombergBNA President, Scott Mozarsky, penned a recent Above the Law article where he stressed the importance of what law firm libraries and librarians do to drive business in the door at law firms. He mentions that law librarians and legal marketers are teaming up and becoming a powerhouse within the firm to help drive business development and client awareness of the firm's abilities. He mentions that this is a great collaboration, and that he is seeing more firms adopt the Researcher/Marketer team approach. I've seen this exact scenario going on in law firms for nearly two decades, and I'm sure it preceded my entry into the market. Mozarsky is correct in that this makes perfect sense to team up the analytical skills of the law library researcher, and the business and marketing skills of the law firm marketer. It's a perfect match of strategy put into action.

The one area that I have to alternate from the path with Mozarsky suggests, is that this means that it makes perfect sense to place the library under the CMO. To that, I would have to answer, well... it depends.

In my personal experience, and from the anecdotes I've heard from my peers over the past twenty years, it was the librarians that have been pushing for the teaming up of marketing and research, and the CMOs have been very reluctant to adopt this strategy. I know... I know... ever firm is unique, so this may not apply to you. However, I would go out on a limb here and say that most firms that have this type of collaboration, the idea was pitched by the library staff and the marketing department had to be won over to try it out. That's not to say that CMOs are anti-library, but it does say that librarians tend to be very good and leveraging the existing tools, resources, and people to augment the overall strategy of the firm. We understand that driving new business, or expanding existing business is a strategy that all firms have, and we know that we can contribute to that goal. Because we sometimes lack the seat at the table, the idea of leveraging this wealth of resources already at the disposal of the firm may have been overlooked.

The law library at most firms contain the most credentialed staff in that firm. The fact that the most credentialed staff in the firm doesn't have a Chief voice speaking directly for them is a lost opportunity for those firms who ignore them. I am quite proud to talk with others and tell them that they need to understand, my firm's unique. We have a voice at the table, and we are heard.

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2 comments:

Law library director said...

Thank you for pointing out that librarians are the most credentialed professionals at the firm, and also that they often initiate marketing/library partnerships. If you could please clarify or say more about this sentence, that would be great: "By my count, there are approximately 7 CKO where they are Librarians in the AmLaw 200. (Or some variation, like me, where I am a Chief Knowledge Services Officer"

Greg Lambert said...

AmLaw 200 Firms with CKOs (Librarians)
Hogan Lovells
Steptoe & Johnson
Nixon Peabody
Jackson Lewis
Jackson Walker
Bryan Cave
Fox Rothschild
Stinson Leonard Street

Additional Firm:
Dilworth Paxson

 

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