4/20/11

Disruptive Announcements; LPM 2.0 and JDMatch

This past week there were two announcements that confirm the emergence of disruptive forces in the legal market. First, Jim Hassett announced version 2.0 of his LPM Guide, and second, Bruce MacEwen announced the new JDMatch service
LPM 2.0
Jim Hassett release the second, updated version of the Legal Project Management Quick Reference Guide this past week. Although there is general consensus in the market that lawyers need to adopt legal project management (LPM) in some fashion, there is little consensus as to the form that should take. Some argue for a full-on PMBOK approach, while others argue for a “Baby Steps” approach. Serving on his advisory group gave me the opportunity to comment and see previews of the update version.
The Guide is useful since it can accommodate a variety of approaches. It can be utilized as an A-to-Z tool, or lawyers can pick and chose the aspects of the Guide they find useful. The intent and style of it accommodates both perspectives. Jim’s general approach to LPM is one of injecting project management principles into lawyers’ existing practice methods. The Guide reflects this approach and can shy away from more formal PMI-type methods.
The updated Guide reflects the continuing evolution and expansion of LPM in the market.
JDMatch
The existing method for matching law students to law firms for potential employment is much like the rest of the industry – full of rich traditions and incredible inefficiencies. So Bruce MacEwen and Janet Stanton over at the Adam Smith, Esq blog developed a new approach. They are using technology to greatly expedite the process and provide a better informed method for helping law firms and law students connect. Students and law firms input their preferences into the system, then “matching” algorithms are run to demonstrate the best matches for both sides. This eliminates the need for both parties to spend time on unlikely opportunities.
The system is new and yet to be proven, but the idea is quite intriguing. You can read more about this on their Blog and on the WSJ Law Blog.
We wish the best of luck to Bruce and Janet in this new endeavor.
What’s Next?
We will likely see more tools and market players enter the scene with disruptive ideas and technologies. We have all been talking about the need for change for some time now. So it’s refreshing and encouraging to see changes actually come.

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